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30,000 Cows Killed?…..

Posted by Pete | Posted in News | Posted on 02-01-2016

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According to Betsy Blaney of the Associated Press writing in today’s, 1/1/16, Albuquerque Journal: The snow storm in New Mexico and West Texas last weekend has killed approximately 30,000 cows. Those dairies around  Lubbock, Muleshoe, and Friona, Texas account for nearly 40% of the milk production in Texas. Those dairies figure they lost about 15,000 mature cows. Also, an agent with New Mexico State University’s extension service said the area around Clovis, NM lost approximately 20,000 cows. The snow was a big reason for the deaths but the wind was the real villain, blowing drifts of up to 14 feet where many of the animals died. Wind pushed the animals into a fenced corners where they would bunch up and suffocate in those snow drifts. Employees could not reach the farms to do the milking and tanker trucks could not get to the dairies to haul the milk. When the cows are not milked they lose the capacity to produce milk as it dries up their milk production and will affect milk production for some time to come….. The Texas producers are working with state environmental officials to find ways to dispose of the carcasses. Some counties are allowing producers to put carcasses in their landfills. The loss of the mature cows and their milk production loss is costly to those dairy farmers and will greatly affect all those communities. Hopefully they will be able to recover from this terrible winter storm.

Comments (2)

Not a word of empathy for the cows.

There was no address to send condolences, but it is very sad and I am sorry if the article seemed cold hearted. ..We hate to see and hear of any living thing suffering. Sorry. Please come see us again…Pete

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